NYC DOT Accepting Applications to Privatize Parking Meters

parking ticket for expired parking meterDNAinfo.com reports parking ticket news:

The NYC DOT is accepting applications from companies to privatize its 40,000 parking meters, which are expected to generate $125M in revenue in 2012. That is a whole bunch of nickels (remember when?). According to Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Kahn, “The idea is just to solicit any and all ideas…We’re just opening the door to see what’s out there.”

However, NYC made it clear to prospective applicants that it will retain the power to fix parking rates and parking ticket enforcement. Why not, parking ticket warriors and cops issued about 2.5 million parking-meter related NYC parking tickets. That, too, is a whole bunch of nickels.

The Great Chicago parking meter nightmare

The City of Chicago experienced major controversy and larger than life headaches when it out-sourced its parking meters. Hopefully, NYC will learn from Chicago’s myriad mistakes.

Many other cities are experimenting with parking meter related ideas to increase revenues. For example, Santa Monica California recently unveiled a plan for its parking meters to immediately gobble up any unused meter time faster than a NY minute after a chariot vacates a parking space.

NYC is experimenting with demand parking meter pricing, electronic sensors embedded in the roadway notifying drivers of vacant spacing, and more.

A recent NY Times article reported a new market is developing in buying-selling unused time on muni-meter receipts.

What’s the next step in the parking meter privatization process?

According to the excellent report by Jill Colvin from DNAinfo.com:

“Companies have until Tuesday July 31 to submit applications for consideration. A request for proposals is expected to follow if the city decides there are enough qualified bidders.”

Commentary

I wish to extend a big “thank you” to our great friend Vincent for a “heads-up” about this parking meter privatization plan. As far as I’m concerned it’s too early to tell the impact, if any, on our driving community.

What do you think? Share!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>